Feeds:
Posts
Comments

  

Since we came round Malin Head five days ago we seem to have battled against headwinds. I’m sure all us paddlers (and cyclists for that matter) on expedition complain about the winds being against them. And I’m sure we only remember those days slogging it out against the wind rather than those where the sun warmed our backs and the winds have us a gentle push on our way. But we do seem to have had more than our fair share. But hey, no complaints – everyday is an adventure and a physical and psychological roller coaster.  If one of us is feeling low or slow, the other will try and perk them up. We’ve found that food and singing usually do the trick. Distracting each other from the thought of cranking out 30 or so miles a day has become a distinct skill of ours.

As for the singing – not sure we will be repeating performances on terra firma, but our repertoire is developing into an eclectic mix – The Auld Triangle,  South Australia, Wish You Were Here, Cecilia, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia…..if you happen to find yourself on a headland along the Irish East coast over the next few days, and the wind is blowing in the right direction, you might just catch us murdering a great song.

On the way to Whitehead on Saturday we came across a charity cycle event in Larne. It was in aid of http://www.makeadifferenceworldwide.com – who are currently helping disadvantaged people in Malawi. Looked like a great event despite the strong headwinds (we have something in common with cyclists). The organisers saw us land and straight away invited over, gave us soup and food and made us feel very welcome.

Thanks so much guys and best of luck with the fund raising!

Last night we reached the south end of the Ards Peninsula and got a sneaky camp in the grounds of the Quintin Castle – an old Norman building – now updated and renovated complete with its own slipway and heli pad. Not a bad place to kip for the night.

This morning we made only 11 miles before the winds picked up to F7 and gusting F8. When Geoff got surfed over some rocks we decided it was time to get off. So now we are in the club house at Ardglass golf club, drinking tea and eating cake whilst looking out at a wild sea.

Right now we have covered 790 miles and have about 160 to go.  
Thank you to Chris, Janet and Morgan for your very generous donations! Around £1200 raised now Рamazing stuff!
   
  

    

Making the most of the stream on this side of the country as the tide is squeezed between Ireland and Scotland. That means paddling two shifts a day – early morning to lunchtime and again in the evening.. 735 miles down and 215 or so to go.

Yesterday at Malin Head we ate breakfast on the beach watching dolphins broach and summersault in the bay before jumping on the tide to Portstewart where we relaxed and took on calories before jumping back in the evening tide around the Giants Causeway. A stunning way to see this world heritage site. 

We ended the day pulling up to a cottage at the base of the cliffs around the corner from the Causeway. The only way to get to the cottage is by sea. It has it’s own natural harbour. Sadly we were camping on the outside but it was idyllic. We watched the sunset and drank the last of our malt whiskey, a 16 year old Lagavulin. From where we sat we could see the Scottish Island of Islay – which appropriately is home to the Lagavulin distillery.

We climbed into bed as the full moon rose, reminding us that we are on spring tides and so the stream is good!

Today was fun. The stream past Rathlin Island had us ticking along at 8 and 9 miles am hour. We turned south and then had to paddle in the eddies to avoid the north going flood tide which was running well over 3 miles an hour.

The morning sunshine gave way to a sudden fog bank that descended – just as well it was time to get off the water and wait for the next tide anyway. We spent the afternoon in Cushendun before pushing on this evening to Glenarm. 

The next few days are all about the miles. We’ve a pretty good idea which day we will finish now – but of course it is weather dependent. 

Hands are swollen, various body parts ache and we’re both sleep deprived but each day is an incredible experience that we don’t want to take for granted.

Massive thank you to ‘Sam’, Janet, Sylv and Martyn for your incredibly generous donations! The total is coming along very nicely now – thank you!

   
                

Geoff has been keeping a tally of the number of Guinesses we’ve had since we started this adventure. Apparently I  am one behind him – 25 to 24. 

He’s just gone to buy provisions so guess what ……it is all square now!

  

Brief post tonight but wanted to provide an update. Today we said goodbye to the west coast. It’s been exhilarating. We seen some amazing scenary and wildlife and met some wonderful people.

We’ve also experienced some incredible conditions. They’ve been testing but they’ve also been fun.

This morning as we were preparing to leave we met an ecologist who had been conducting a bird survey along the local cliffs around Horn Head. Fascinating guy who helped us identify some of the birds we had seen but didn’t know what they were.   Our list of birds now looks like:

Guillemots , Black Backed Gull, Razor Bill, Puffins, Storm Petrel, Black Guillemots, Fulmers, Terns, Skewers, Oyster Catchers, Chuffs, Gannets and a few more we still don’t know the name of.

We left Portnablagh in perfect conditions and made our way up to the most northern tip of Ireland, Malin Head where we are now. Eight hours in the kayak to cover the 30 miles.
We think we have less than 300 miles to go.

A massive thank you to Sara, Jan and Tony, and Suzanne, Richard and Family for your donations. Our total stands at over a thousand pounds now! Two thirds of the way to our target.

Tomorrow we are aiming for Port Rush.

  

A couple of shots from our camp site this morning in Portnablagh and looking out towards Horn Head.

   
 

It is 10.30pm and I’m in my tent. What’s that I hear? – Absolutely nothing. The winds have died down for what must be, the first time in a couple of weeks. Today out on the water Geoff and I noticed a marked increase in the warmth of the air that the southerly wind has brought in. Maybe summer has arrived.

The last few days we have had very strong tailwinds and we’ve managed to make some decent progress. Last night we spent on Aranmore and today we’re in Portnablagh. 

Tomorrow we’ll be round Malin Head and just beginning to make the slow right hand turn to head south again. It will mean the end of the west coast and the Atlantic swell. It has taken us three weeks to negotiate the west coast and it has been the most extraordinary experience that neither of us will forget, but we’re ready for the long push home now. 

We’ve covered 630 miles so far and think we have around 330 to go.

No dramatic sea stories today, sorry about that – although my Mum may be relieved!

Thank you Pauline for your very generous donation to our charities. We’ll be in touch when we get back.

Some photos from Glencolmcille where we stayed a couple of nights ago and where we met Margaret, Margaret and Kevin from the Folk Village Museum – such a fascinating place which will need another visit one day soon.